Panic Inc.

Panic Blog

From the desk of Cabel
Portland, Oregon 97205

How “Complete My Bundle” Pricing Works

With the release of Transmit iOS and Prompt 2, we excitedly added two Panic Pack bundles to the App Store. Bundles are a great chance to reward loyal customers a little bit of a discount on our software — something that was not possible to do on the App Store previously.

Even better, customers can “Complete My Bundle” — if they’ve bought any of our apps, they can pay the difference to receive additional missing apps at a discount.

app-bundle-transmit-prompt2@2x app-bundle-complete@2x

But once our bundles hit the App Store, some curious “Complete My Bundle” questions began to roll in. Pricing seemed to be weird or inconsistent. So we did a little digging and got some good tips on Twitter.

Here’s all you need to know:

Complete My Bundle takes whatever money you’ve paid for the individual apps and applies that towards the bundle’s fixed price. So, if you buy an app on sale, or use a promo code, your Complete My Bundle price can be different than someone else’s, and in some situations it might be cheaper to buy the remaining app(s) individually.

That’s it.

It explains a mystery like this:

bundlewhat

The user owns three of the four apps. Why would the user’s Complete My Bundle price be $10.02, if Prompt 2 alone is $9.99?

Here’s why: the user bought Transmit iOS for $9.99, Status Board for $9.99, and Diet Coda when it was briefly on SALE for $9.99. That’s a total of $29.97 worth of “credit” towards the price of the bundle. Now, the bundle’s fixed price is $39.99, based off current app prices. See where this is going? $39.99, minus $29.97 in credit, equals $10.02. Bingo. Don’t complete this bundle.

Apple has just posted a useful Knowledge Base Article covering this issue (and others) — it’s helpful information that we will likely be pointing our customers towards.

We hope this helps clear up any mysteries, and as always, we’re very happy that you’re buying our software and we deeply appreciate your support!

Posted at 10:01 am 9 Comments

Introducing Prompt 2

prompt2@2x

It’s amazing. Three years ago, we released Prompt, a nice, clean, powerful SSH client for iOS. And ever since then, you’ve told us your Prompt stories — fixing a dead server from a beach! Tweaking a webpage in the middle of a client meeting! — and we’ve loved every minute of it. Putting the power of a full-featured SSH app in your pocket (or on your iPad!) has been more fulfilling than we ever expected.

Well, now it’s time to take Prompt to the next level. We’ve been working very hard on Prompt 2, a brand new app!

pr_source-2

To start, Prompt 2 adds Panic Sync, our already-proven and secure way to sync your servers, passwords, and keys between Prompt on all your devices. This is a big deal. That means servers follow you from your iPhone to your iPad, effortlessly. (Panic Sync doesn’t yet allow you to sync between, say, Transmit and Prompt, but that’s something theoretically possible we hope to add in the future, and one of the advantages of running our own sync service.)

pr_source-3

As you can see, we also gave Prompt a fresh new look — a little bit sleeker, a little bit more cybernetic — and of course we made sure it was ready for the iPhone 6 and iPhone 6 Plus. And man, the dramatic, black interface looks absolutely incredible on an iPhone 6. There are lots of nice visual touches.

Another way to save server-time? Clips. Now you can save your frequently-used commands (or text snippets) and insert them at any time with a tap. And yes, your Clips sync between your devices as well!

clips

There’s a ton more. We’ve expanded Prompt’s private key handling abilities. You can now generate private keys in Prompt, making it very easy to set up a new, secure connection. It’s easier to switch between open connections. And there’s also Touch ID support so you can secure Prompt, and your sensitive servers, with your just fingerprint.

All in all, it’s a very nice update to a very nice app.

Check out Prompt 2 in the App Store and let us know how it helps you!

Prompt 2 is $9.99, and available right now. It will automatically import your data from Prompt 1.

Of course, we’re not done. We’ve already wrapped up Prompt 2.0.1 (submitting today!) and will be on the lookout for your bugs and ideas. See something weird? E-mail us! Have a cool idea? Let us know! We’re on it — we want Prompt 2 to be the best SSH app for iOS, period.

(Like all Panic products, Prompt 2 was a team effort, born under Dave, with Neven’s excellent design, Kenichi’s icon, Ashur’s testing and guidance, Logan’s sync magic, and more. But the true champion of Prompt 2, the one who did the actual work of implementing all the new features and shipping the app, was Heather, who is the best. Thank you!)

Posted at 11:21 am 43 Comments

Introducing Transmit iOS

 

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Some ideas don’t make sense until suddenly they do.

Ever since it became possible to write third-party iOS apps, we’ve received the occasional request to bring Transmit to iOS and, to be honest, it never made much sense to us. That is, until this year’s WWDC.

Up until that point, iOS apps had very limited reach in terms of access to other apps’ documents, so we struggled to find an answer to our time-honored litmus test of “what would we use this for?” Was an app that simply allowed you to transfer files in and out of itself particularly useful?

Especially with many highly-regarded file storage and document reader apps already on the App Store, it seemed like our chances of carving a worthwhile niche were tiny at best. We experimented with the idea a little and ultimately shelved it.

Then came the introduction of iOS 8. It’s an exciting update for users, and a really exciting release for developers, not least because of a little something called App Extensions. By utilizing App Extensions, Transmit could effectively provide standard file transfer protocols for any iOS 8 app. Overnight, this idea that made very little sense suddenly made all the sense in the world.

And so, after a bit of a mad dash to get it ready in time for iOS 8’s debut, we’re proud to introduce Transmit iOS. It’s the world’s best file transfer client, now seamlessly integrated right into your iPhone or iPad.

 

02 - File Listing

Browsing a directory listing

Not just a pretty face, Transmit iOS shares the same rock-solid engine as the Mac version, so you’ll find all of our currently supported protocols: FTP, SFTP, WebDAV, Amazon S3, and S3-compatible services such as DreamObjects.

Every compatibility and performance tweak that has made its way into the Transmit engine over the last 16 years (!) is present and accounted for. Future improvements and fixes will make their way to both the Mac and iOS versions.

01 - Servers

Browsing available servers and connection options

03 - Clouds

Previewing a remote image

On iOS, Transmit gets a fresh new look — in perfect harmony with iOS 8’s style but with a bit of our own flair. In the Transmit app, you can store, download, and upload files as with any pre-iOS 8 file manager, but it’s the way Transmit extends your whole iOS experience that’s the best part.

Let’s start with sharing.

You’re probably already familiar with the Share button in iOS. If you’re, say, looking at a photo, you can tap the Share button and send the photo by email, iMessage, AirDrop, and so on. With Transmit iOS installed, you can also now send that photo (or other document) to any FTP, SFTP, WebDAV or Amazon S3 server, right from Photos.

In other words, any iOS app that supports the Share sheet magically gains support for these protocols when you install Transmit iOS.

05 - Share Sheet

Sharing photos with Transmit iOS

Without leaving the app you’re in, you can bring up a full Transmit interface within that app, navigate to a particular folder, and send your file. Then Transmit goes away and you’re right back where you were, without any cumbersome app switching. That’s a big deal, and a first for iOS.

But wait, there’s more!

New in iOS 8 is the Document Picker. The Document Picker is an extensible way for iOS apps to open a document from an outside source.

Transmit iOS hooks in here too, which means — you guessed it — any iOS 8 app that supports the Document Picker can now open files remotely from your FTP, SFTP, WebDAV or Amazon S3 server, without leaving that app.

(You can even re-save the document, and the changes will go back to the server it came from!)

Concerned about security? If you’d like, Transmit iOS can restrict access to your servers by requiring Touch ID authentication. That means you don’t have to remember or re-enter your server password each time.

We think Transmit iOS is a fantastic new way for advanced users to manage files on their iPhone, iPad, and beyond. Since it’s a brand new 1.0 product, we’ll be looking forward to your feedback to help us steer it in the right direction.

Please give Transmit iOS a try and let us know what you think!

Also worth noting: Transmit iOS is currently only $9.99 for a limited time. If you want to get in on this incredible new tool, we suggest doing it quickly!

(One last note: many people here were involved in making Transmit iOS, including years of FTPKit care and feeding from Wade and Will, and Neven’s immaculate design work, but I wanted to specifically send a big thank you to all-around Panic good guy Logan, who worked tirelessly to make Transmit iOS happen. Thanks so much, Logan!)

 

Posted at 1:10 pm 32 Comments

From the desk of
James
Engineering Dept.

PunchClock: Fun With iBeacons

PunchClockSometimes at Panic we build internal stuff that never sees the light of the outside world. This is one of those projects: an automatic in/out tracker for the Panic Team.

OK, sure, there’s not that many people that work here so it’s not a huge issue for our team, but it still seemed like something interesting to try. I originally hacked together an in/out tracker that used a combination of SNMP, ARP table lookups, and plain old port scanning to figure out who was theoretically “in”. It wasn’t so reliable and was eventually removed from our Status Board. What I didn’t know was that Apple would soon deliver a solution to our (not-so) mission-critical problem.

With the arrival of iBeacons in iOS 7, Apple was clearly moving into retail and public spaces in a whole new way. It was no longer enough to have an app for the store you are shopping in — the app could now react to your location within the store. iBeacons themselves typically do little more than broadcast an ID to notify your device that you’re near them. The idea is to spread these relatively cheap, dumb beacons around a space and then let iOS and a cloud service figure out what content the visitor should see.

Going further, iOS 8 adds a button to the lock screen when you’re in an area registered with Apple to provide indoor location tracking. That button launches the relevant app if you have it installed or takes you to the App Store if you don’t. Cool stuff.

With this new technology in-hand, it wasn’t too long before I put together a brand new office In/Out tracker called PunchClock. It uses a combination of a geo-fence and iBeacon tracking, plus a simple Sinatra backend hosted at Heroku. The part that took the longest to fine-tune was figuring out the right combination of polling to provide good location information without draining the battery.

Once we had reliable In/Out data, I thought it would be interesting to allow you to be notified (in a hopefully non-creepy way) the moment someone entered or left the office. The final notable feature of PunchClock is the ability to send push messages to everyone marked as “In” — mainly in case you get locked out of the office, or locked in the bathroom. Neven did some nice UI, Cabel made a couple of tiny notification sounds, and the app was complete.

While Apple’s iBeacon technology continues to be rolled out in big box stores and sports stadiums, there’s no reason you can’t put it to use in your own home or office now.

We’re making PunchClock available on Github so you can create your own In/Out tracker. The backend provides JSON data to the app as well as a DIY panel for Status Board.

To be honest, you’re going to have to be pretty technically-capable to set up your own instance of PunchClock. This isn’t a shipping retail product, and it’s not for the faint of heart. But if you’re a coder and you’re ready for a fun night of hacking, we’d love to see what you do with it. We’ll try to do our best to explain the process in the README for the app and backend.

PunchClock was fun for us, and we hope it’s fun for you.


Posted at 2:24 pm 24 Comments

From the desk of Cabel
Portland, Oregon 97205

Coda 2.5 and the Mac App Store

coda-logoOver a year ago, I wrote a blog post about Coda and Sandboxing.

It detailed a thorough list of changes we’d be making to Coda to work under Apple’s Sandboxing restrictions. Click here to read it if you haven’t.

As we continued to work on Coda 2.5—a significant update that we’re really excited about—we continued to discover new corners of the app that presented challenges under sandboxing. Coda, to be fair, is a very complex developer tool and is something of a sandboxing worst-case scenario.

Apple, to their considerable credit, spent a lot of energy assisting us with ideas, workarounds, and temporary exemptions we might be able to use to get around some of the issues. Apple genuinely went above and beyond the call of duty, and we’re really thankful for their help. We got extremely close and jumped over a lot of tricky hurdles thanks to them.

Unfortunately, though, we’ve run out of time.

Coda 2.5 is essentially complete. But, we’re still encountering sandboxing challenges. So, in the interest of finally getting Coda 2.5 out the door and in the hands of you, our very eager and patient customers, we’ve decided it’s time to move on—for now.

In short: Coda 2.5 will not be sandboxed, and therefore will not be available in the Mac App Store.

Please note that this doesn’t mean Coda 2.5 was rejected by Apple, rather that we’re going ahead and proactively making this call since all Mac App Store apps are required to be sandboxed and Coda 2.5 will not be.

The good news? Three-fold.

  1. The transition will be effortless.
  2. Your workflow will now be unscathed.
  3. We’re adding Panic Sync.

Read on.

• I bought Coda in the App Store. What do I need to do?

Nothing right now. Keep App Store Coda on your system and use it.

Then, when Coda 2.5 is released, you’ll simply download Coda 2.5 directly from our website. It’ll locate your installed Mac App Store copy, and it will unlock. That’s it. You’ve transitioned. Free of charge.

• What about iCloud Sync of my sites?

iCloud requires the App Store, so that’s out. But we have great news. We never want to short-change our paying customers, so we’ve spent many months working on Panic Sync, our own super-easy, super-secure syncing solution that gives you power over your data. And Panic Sync will work between Panic apps—Coda and Diet Coda to start. And Panic Sync is free. In short, we’ll trade you iCloud for something great.

• What about automatic updating?

Still there. Coda has a great built-in updater. In fact, you’ll get critical updates faster than ever before.

• What about easy installation on a new computer?

We love that part of the Mac App Store. Sigh. But from now on, you’ll have to download Coda 2.5 directly from our website. Hopefully, that’s a very minor inconvenience; we’ll make sure it downloads fast and easy.

• Will Coda ever be sandboxed or return to the App Store?

We hope so! We will always evaluate the possibility of sandboxing with each future release of Coda.

• What’s new in Coda 2.5? When will it be released?

Shh… we’ve been posting sneak peeks of new features on Twitter. And we’re in late beta, but no date is set.

Thank you so much for reading and understanding. Most importantly, thank you for using Coda!

Update: Coda 2.5 is now available! Read more about it and get it here.

Posted at 11:47 am 89 Comments