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From the desk of Cabel
Portland, Oregon 97205

Firewatch. February 9th, 2016.

Our beautiful, gripping first-person adventure game set in the Wyoming wilderness is almost here.

Firewatch is coming to Mac, Windows, Linux, and PlayStation 4… at the same time. February 9th 2016.

Here’s the official game website, and here’s Campo’s awesome dev blog.

Our friends at Campo Santo are still polishing, optimizing, writing, and developing the very last bits of the game, working hard to make it amazing, and we can’t wait to put it out there. We’ll keep you posted, of course, and remind you when it’s getting close.

I can’t wait.

This is something special.

Posted at 9:29 am 6 Comments

From the desk of Cabel
Portland, Oregon 97205

Panic + OS X El Capitan

OS X 10.11 El Capitan
Now that OS X El Capitan (10.11) has shipped, just a quick note on Panic Compatibility!

Coda 2.5Coda 2

With the release of Coda 2.5.12, Coda 2 works great with OS X El Capitan.

If you’re not yet running Coda 2.5.12, click here to auto-update.

(Check the Coda 2.5.12 release notes if you’re curious about the handful of El Cap bugs we found and fixed.)

Transmit 4.4Transmit 4

Transmit 4.4.8 already works great with OS X El Capitan – no update required.

But, Transmit Disk feature is not yet compatible now compatible with OS X El Capitan.

UPDATE 10/16 — We’ve now posted Transmit Disk 4.4.9, which should work with El Capitan. For now, you can download it on this Panic Library page and install it separately. We’ll integrate it into Transmit soon.


Panic Reference LibraryHave you seen the Panic Library?

Most of this update is basically copied from our Panic Library — which we work hard to keep up to date with helpful articles about our software. If you’re ever stumped, please check it out!

Posted at 12:03 pm 10 Comments

Status Board 2 is Here Also


There’s a funny thing I’ve noticed in the Panic office: our beautiful status board is second only to our weird-snack wall as the office conversation spot. We often gather in front of our status board to discuss funny tweets, or look at our sales charts and figure out what’s next. It’s a center point. And you should have one too — for your home, your office, your business, anywhere.

We built Status Board so that everyone can make an incredible status board.

And now, Status Board has hit version 2.0, free update to our powerful iPad app that makes beautiful status board creation as easy as dragging, dropping, and configuring.

We started with multiple board support: now you can set up an infinite number of status boards, and automatically rotate between them. It’s great. There’s also a brand-new UI, built from scratch. There’s some new panel types. There’s publish and subscribe, so you can create a beautiful board for your organization and automatically update everyone’s boards remotely.

There’s also an interesting pricing change: the app is FREE. Yes, you can try Status Board without paying a cent, including six panel types. If you like Status Board, and you want to do more, six more panel types are only $9.99 in our “expansion pack”.

If you bought Status Board 1, don’t worry: we’ll automatically unlock all twelve panels for you. It’s our thanks for your continued support.

You can read all about Status Board 2 here — or,  just go ahead and get it on the App Store.

Like Coda for iOS, it took us a little while to get this out the door, but we think it’s worth it. It’s packed with new stuff.

When you set up your cool status board, please tweet us a photo!

Posted at 1:30 pm 9 Comments

Coda 2 for iOS is Here


Diet Coda just got an update so big, we didn’t feel comfortable calling it “Diet” anymore. (Ho-ho.)

Introducing Coda for iOS (formerly Diet Coda) version 2.0, a massive, free update to our incredible, desktop-class text editor. It gives you an incredible amount of power tucked into your iPad or, now… also your iPhone.

iPhone support is not the only new thing. There’s a brand-new UI redone from scratch. Full Panic Sync support. More syntax modes. Better file management including our dual-pane file browser. The latest SSH engine from Prompt. Javascript Playgrounds. More nice touches around every corner.

And, once again, this is a free update for Diet Coda owners. (You may already have it.)

For everyone else, we just reduced the price: $9.99. To be honest, that feels nuts for the amount of work put into the app. But a bargain is a bargain! (You should grab it now before we change our minds.)

Read all about Coda for iOS here. (Or, if you want, just grab it on the App Store!)

Thank you for your patience while we worked on this enormous overhaul. We truly hope you enjoy it. Tell us what you make with it! And if you find any bugs or have ideas, send us an e-mail!

Posted at 12:34 pm 12 Comments

From the desk of Cabel
Portland, Oregon 97205

Firewatch. Mac, PC, and now, PlayStation 4.


Have you heard of our upcoming game, Firewatch? (It’s a first-person mystery/drama/adventure set in the Wyoming wilderness. You’re Henry. You just got a job in a Firewatch tower. You make contact with another watcher who only exists on the other end of a handheld radio. And then… things happen.)

Being developed by a talented bunch of smarties at Campo Santo, we’re immensely excited to be publishing what’s shaping up to be something special.

We’ve already announced that Firewatch will be coming first to the Mac and PC. (And at WWDC we announced that the Mac version will support Metal for ultimate performance and fidelity! We’re really excited about this.)

But we just announced the other half of the equation…

Firewatch will also be coming to your PlayStation 4.

And there’s more:

Here’s the brand new trailer we just unveiled at Sony’s E3 Keynote:

And here are some fresh in-game screenshots of Firewatch:







We haven’t announced a release date yet — or the release date for the PlayStation 4 version — but keep an eye on our Twitter and we’ll let you know the moment we know.

We can’t wait to take you to this place!

UPDATE 6/16: Some further reading. Jake discusses how we put together the trailer for Sony’s crazy huge screen. And over on Sony’s PlayStation Blog, Chris talks about how we landed on PlayStation 4.

Posted at 6:40 pm 13 Comments

From the desk of
Engineering Dept.

Violet Beep

I have a 1-year-old daughter named Violet.

For whatever reason, we began calling her Beep. Sometimes Beepy. Usually Beep. Rarely Violet. These things happen.

Yesterday, Ashur and Heather revealed to me a tiny little easter egg they snuck into our SSH app, Prompt 2.1

With the right set of steps, you can switch the normally-white visual beep to be… violet.

Heather coded it up and Ashur made this graphic to reveal the secret:

Basically, I will know you are the deepest of Panic fan if you are rocking the purple flash. (Someday I’ll explain this to Violet. Probably her first question will be, “Wait, you called me what?”.)

There aren’t a lot of secrets in Panic apps, but I’ll never forget this one.

Posted at 12:49 pm 8 Comments

From the desk of Cabel
Portland, Oregon 97205

Firewatch Demo Day at GDC

You knew Panic was making a game, right?

Technically, we’re not actually making the game — we provided the funds to launch both a brand new game studio, Campo Santo, and an ambitious upcoming game… Firewatch.

Panic is, I guess, the “publisher”, although to me that conjures up imagery of a guy in a suit slamming a table and yelling “If you don’t add a goddamn assault rifle in the first five minutes of this snooze-fest we’re shutting this whole thing down!”. We are not that publisher. Campo Santo has become extended Panic family, and we feel as strongly about Firewatch as we do any of our apps.

“In Firewatch, you play as a man named Henry who has retreated from his messy life to work as a fire lookout in the Wyoming wilderness. Perched high atop a mountain, it’s your job to look for smoke and keep the wilderness safe. Your supervisor, a woman named Delilah, is available to you at all times over a small, handheld radio — and is your only contact with the world you’ve left behind.”

You can watch 17 minutes of gameplay here. The game already looks incredible:




Now, while Campo builds the game, it’s Panic’s job to help sell it.

We talked a lot about how we wanted to do that. Should we get a booth at PAX? E3? What’ll get the word out best? Trade show booths are notoriously expensive — I’ll never forget getting yelled at once because I was carrying in a single box to our Macworld Booth one year, that was the Union’s job!, not to mention the $1,500 three-day internet — plus your game gets lost in a giant sea of bright lights and loud garbage.

So, we focused on GDC — the Game Developer’s Conference — a time when a lot of press and peers are in one place. Then, we thought it’d be more cost effective and possibly more powerful to do something “off-campus” — make a destination for attendees. And since not everyone can afford to attend GDC, we thought it’d be incredible to do a Public Demo Day, where anyone in town could play an early build of Firewatch for themselves, for free.

Sounds great. But how could we make this event feel amazing for our guests?

We needed to find the right space… and lights… and trees.

Because we brought Firewatch to life.

Firewatch (1 of 11)

Guests were greeted with some helpful signage. To the right, we built a full recreation of Henry’s tower and desk… down to the smallest Olly Moss-crafted detail.

Firewatch (2 of 11)

Firewatch (6 of 11)

Firewatch (5 of 11)

On the left, we set up these demo stations with the latest build of the game right in the middle of our own tiny forest.

Firewatch (11 of 13)

Firewatch (10 of 11)

Firewatch (12 of 3)

(That’s Rich Sommer, the voice of Henry in our game — you know him as Harry Crane from Mad Men. I asked if it was weird playing a game with his own voice but he said that kind of out-of-body experience doesn’t really affect him anymore.)

We even included some cool special effects, like this magic poster at the entry stairs:


(FYI, the secret to an eye-fooling projection is to project onto a textured surface — in our case, canvas — and layer a lighting effect on top that spills outside the primary surface — in this case, faux window light.)

The doors opened and we were slammed. Nearly a thousand people showed up to our (quickly-very-toasty) venue and played the game. We got a giant stack of feedback forms and learned a lot about what was, and what wasn’t, working. The experience was invaluable for us.

Firewatch (13 of 3)

Plus, the reactions to the demo have blown us away:

Rock Paper Shotgun: “It was agonising when the demo ended – I desperately wanted to play more. I wanted to know what happens next! Despite the fact that, looking back, what had happened so far was so relatively mundane. It was the strength of the characters, and the wonderful sense of place, that made me not want to have to leave.”

gameinformer:Firewatch is my favorite game from GDC. It immediately hooked me, and I never knew what I would find next. […]  I’m still thinking a lot about my time with Firewatch, and that says something.”

Spectre Collie: “If we get enough people pointing at a beautiful, engaging, and mature experience and saying, ‘This. We want to make more of this,’ then the entire medium will be better off.”

Firewatch has been teed up.

The goal is in our sights.

Now we just have to hit a home run.

I’m not good with sports analogies.

We hope to release Firewatch in late 2015 for Mac, PC, and an as-yet-undisclosed console.

(Production notes! The bulk of the planning, design, and hard work for this event was done by Greg here at Panic, who really did an incredible job. Beautiful photos courtesy Sebastiaan De With. The venue was The Box SF, which was already laden with warm wood and tower-ready windows. Lighting and sound was installed by Got Light. Props came from the incredible Prop House. Our ambient forest sound loops were crafted by Jared Emerson-Johnson. Boombox audio from the incredible Cheap Talk as discovered by Chris Remo. PCs were provided by Nvidia. Our stump tables and chairs came from Campo’s downstairs neighbor, a woodworker, and they were heavy as all hell as it turns out trees are heavy. When we unloaded the stumps to the Campo office, a random San-Fran-coolguy quickly roosted on one and we love him. Secret party weapon: ambient pine scent provided by a hidden Accuscent HD, which delighted me to no end. And everyone at Campo, of course, worked incredibly hard to guide players, talk to press, make everyone feel welcome! Thanks!)


Posted at 4:56 pm 30 Comments

From the desk of
Engineering Dept.

EditorConfig for Coda 2.5


EditorConfig is a clever idea: a simple text file you can put anywhere in your code source that automatically changes settings in your favorite text editor.

For example, let’s say someone decided one project had to use space indentation (for Python?) even though everybody usually uses tabs. With EditorConfig, you can easily declare this setting in an .editorconfig file in the root of the project…

  1. # top-most EditorConfig file
  2. root = true
  4. # 4 space indentation
  5. [*]
  6. indent_style = space
  7. indent_size = 4

…or you could put this file in any folder in your project, and the editor will automatically pick it up. Then, you can easily check this file in to your source control system. Anyone who checks out your project — and uses a EditorConfig-capable editor — will automatically inherit the recommended editor settings.

We thought this was pretty cool, and so did our users, so we went ahead and built an EditorConfig plug-in for Coda 2.5. It currently supports everything except for the text encoding setting.

If that install link didn’t work, or you don’t want to install it right now, you can browse our plug-ins here.

When you’re ready, read up on the file format here. We hope you enjoy it!

Posted at 3:44 pm 11 Comments

From the desk of
Engineering Dept.

ShrinkIt 1.3

ShrinkIt 1.2 icon

Quite some time ago, we made a quick, free, handy tool called ShrinkIt®.

(Yes, we actually have a registered trademark on ShrinkIt®. Why not!)

ShrinkIt takes bloated Adobe-saved graphic PDFs, runs them through Apple’s PDF renderer, and saves them back out, making many of them smaller without any quality loss.

Note, though: it’s not really for long complex PDF documents or bitmap images. It’s generally for simple PDF symbols and glyphs you might use in your apps, where saving space is critical.

We’ve just updated ShrinkIt to version 1.3, and wanted to let you know!

ShrinkIt Release Notes:

  • Processing is now threaded and significantly faster.
  • It’s now properly signed with our Developer ID
  • There’s a new icon
  • And it’s now Retina-ready
  • 1.3 — Fixed exception when dealing with Unicode file paths
  • 1.3 — Added cool progress bar and gratuitous animation

Two important ShrinkIt instructions:

  1. If a finished file is not smaller after being processed, it will not be saved.
  2. Your original files are renamed with the prefix “_org_” just in case.

We hope it serves you well.

UPDATE 2/11: We bumped it to 1.3.
UPDATE 2/13: Aaaaaand 1.3.2 fixes some problems with 10.7 and 10.8.

Posted at 3:53 pm 7 Comments

Transmit User Survey

What would you like from Transmit in the future? Here’s your chance to let us know.


Posted at 10:28 am 17 Comments